Is it okay for a Christian to change jobs for a better salary package?

We often get stuck at the crossroads of life’s decisions. Decisions regarding studies, career, vocation or business seem hard, especially for faithful believers of the Word of God. We want to please our Lord in every decision we make. This desire to do God’s will in every aspect of our life leads us to think biblically even about our job change. However, we need to understand that the will of God is not mysterious or mystical regarding these issues facing us.

Now, the priorities that the world weighs as precious are overturned for a Christian. For a Christian, salary and fame are not top priorities whereas spiritual growth and kingdom work are resolute factors. We need to understand that our identity is not in the salary we draw or the job we do but our identity is because of who we are in Christ. This doesn’t mean that only low-paid jobs would make you spiritually mature. Nevertheless, we do not imitate the world in our decision-making. Instead, we let the Biblical standard govern our plans and actions. I encourage you to think about the following factors while making a decision to change jobs.

The Coram Deo Factor
To live Coram Deo is to live one’s entire life in the presence of God, under the authority of God, to the glory of God.[1] This regulating principle drives us to honour our Lord through our work irrespective of our pay. Work has intrinsic significance because it gives me the opportunity to do something with joy in the Lord.[2] Although sin and the fall of man have made work difficult, man was created to work and thereby reflect the creativity of his creator.[3] Therefore, we do not change jobs like the people of the world do, just for the hike in salary.

The Sanctity Factor
A believer’s primary calling is for holy living (2 Tim. 1:9). God wants us to be distinct from the world. The litmus test for our holy living is the fruit of the Spirit. Sometimes, a high-paid job could drive a person to be unfair or dishonest. It could also create greed for money (1 Tim. 6:17-19). Therefore, if changing jobs for a fat salary affects your sanctification, it is an alarming sign.

Although sin and the fall of man have made work difficult, man was created to work and thereby reflect the creativity of his creator.

The Gospel Factor
We were once under the wrath of God, but are now redeemed through the finished work of Jesus Christ on the cross. We are saved to be coworkers with God in His redemptive project (Matt. 28:18-20). A change in the job just for a hike in salary could have an effect on the witness a believer is giving at her current workplace. It might give an impression that he or she is not consistent. In addition, gospel relationships developed over a period of time could be disturbed. On the other hand, if a high-paid new job helps you to better witness your faith with more colleagues, you could think about it. Also, if your new job enables you to reach a segment of society which would otherwise be unreached, go for it. Your decision to take that job then would be more for an evangelistic purpose than financial.

The Proximity Factor
Through the church, the manifold wisdom of God is revealed (Eph. 3:10). We grow in the Lord through the fellowship of the church. We even suffer for the sake of the church (Col. 1:24). If my new job detaches me from a healthy church, it is a red signal, regardless of how promising my professional future appears to be.

The Productivity Factor
For a Christian, it doesn’t matter if he is a product designer or a tea maker. It doesn’t matter if he earns a hundred thousand or ten thousand per month. But it does matter if he is working hard to his full potential for the glory of God and for the well-being of others (1 Thess. 4:11-12).

The decisions we make are not without His knowledge. And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose

The Contentment Factor
Paul writes to Timothy, “We brought nothing into this world and we cannot take anything out of the world. But if we have food and clothing, with these we will be content” (1 Tim. 6:7-8). For us riches are not the goal of work, but faithfulness and fruitfulness (productivity) in life for God’s glory. If we have such an attitude, we can echo Apostle Paul’s words in Philippians 4:11-13 that we are content in all circumstances because Christ is sufficient for us.

Finally, understand that sovereignty of God is the unifying factor. Our Heavenly Father is working in the lives of his children through the work of the Holy Spirit to transform them into the likeness of His Son and our Lord Jesus Christ. The decisions we make are not without His knowledge. And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose (Rom. 8:28).


[1] RC Sproul, https://www.ligonier.org/learn/articles/what-does-coram-deo-mean

[2] Tim Challies, https://www.challies.com/christian-living/work-that-makes-a-difference/

[3] Jonathan George, https://equipindianchurches.com/created-to-work/